Recent Fire Damage Posts

Smoking Fires Are Preventable!!

6/22/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Smoking Fires Are Preventable!! Smoking Fires Are Preventable!!

The place where we feel safest — at home — is where most smoking-materials structure fires, deaths, and injuries occur. Smoking materials are the leading cause of fire deaths. Smoking material fires are preventable.

Smoking Safety

  • If you smoke, use only fire-safe cigarettes.
  • If you smoke, smoke outside. Most deaths result from fires that started in living rooms, family rooms and dens or in bedrooms.
  • Keep cigarettes, lighters, matches, and other smoking materials up high out of the reach of children, in a locked cabinet.

Make Sure

  • Use a deep, sturdy ashtray. Place it away from anything that can burn.
  • Do not discard cigarettes in vegetation such as mulch, potted plants or landscaping, peat moss, dried grasses, leaves or other things that could ignite easily.
  • Before you throw away butts and ashes, make sure they are out, and dousing in water or sand is the best way to do that.

Smoking and Medical Oxygen

Never smoke and never allow anyone to smoke where medical oxygen is used. Medical oxygen can cause materials to ignite more easily and make fires burn at a faster rate than normal. It can make an existing fire burn faster and hotter.

Fire Damage Restoration Emergency Response Team in New Jersey, NJ

6/8/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Damage Restoration Emergency Response Team in New Jersey, NJ Fire Damage Restoration Emergency Response Team in New Jersey, NJ

Smoke and fire damage is dependent on several factors which all impact on the fire damage restoration process.

The temperature of the fire and smoke movement determines what damage occurs, and predominately where the most damage occurs. Smoke can penetrate the smallest areas; so it is common in fire and smoke damaged houses are areas that weren’t affected first hand by the fire. It is critical to ensure the fire damage restoration begins as soon as possible.

As smoke is acidic, moisture and humidity are a catalyst to the corrosive dilapidation of finishes and fixtures in the premises. It is hard to imagine a situation more traumatising and unwanted than a fire in your home. Even a small fire can cause extensive damage and impact on your family’s sense of security.

At SERVPRO of Morristown, our Fire Damage Restoration emergency response team are knowledgeable and sympathetic to your situation and should be the first step towards putting your life back together. Securing your New Jersey home to prevent further damage or deterioration is our number one priority.

SERVPRO of Morristown, NJ’s tried and tested fire restoration methods mean we are able to save many building components and valuable personal items. Even if the damage looks severe, items can often be remediated to the pre-damage condition. From furniture to appliances, computers and even family heirlooms, our team of Fire Damage Restoration specialists New Jersey have developed methods to successfully remediate your personal belongings, saving you from more heartache in this unfortunate event.

Contact Professional Fire Damage Restoration Company in New Jersey today 800-734-3213

Fire safety at homes !

6/8/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire safety at homes ! Fire safety at homes !

Spring is when many people decide to open up their seasonal houses, cabins, and cottages. An important part of the preparation is gearing up for fire safety. Just like permanent housing, vacation homes are vulnerable to unsafe conditions.

By the time vacationers arrive at their seasonal homes, the smoke alarms and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms may no longer work and chimneys could be blocked.

Here are some safety tips:

  • Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home.
  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month using the test button.
  • Install CO alarms outside each separate sleeping area, on every level of the home, and in other locations as required by laws, codes, or standards.
  • Test CO alarms at least once a month.
  • Pack extra batteries for smoke alarms and CO alarms in case they need replacing.
  • Make a home escape plan. Practice the plan with everyone in the household, including visitors.
  • Know the telephone number of the local fire department and the address and phone number of the vacation home.
  • Chimneys and vents need to be cleaned and inspected by a qualified professional at least once a year.
  • If you smoke, smoke outside. Use deep, sturdy ashtrays.
  • If you are renting, contact the property manager, landlord, or fire department to be sure that smoke alarms and CO alarms are installed and properly working.

NFPA’s tip sheets provide further information on how to be safe while at your “home away from home.”

Source

http://www.nfpa.org

Fire damage preventing from electronic appliances

6/8/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire damage preventing from electronic appliances Fire damage preventing from electronic appliances

Every electronic items in America is tagged with a large warning label not to use it near water for one obvious reason: mixing the two could result in electrocution and even death. But did you know that it is not actually the water that presents the threat?

Water in its purest form is not conductive. Instead, it is the impurities in the water—salts, dust, and so on—that enables it to conduct electricity.

In fact, low conductivity water (LCW)—which is purified and deionized—has been used for decades to cool high-voltage equipment such as magnets and klystrons.

LCW commonly flows through accelerator magnets to cool them. These rectangular, copper or aluminum wires measure up to two inches per side and are coiled in various arrangements to produce magnetic fields of different shapes and strengths. For example in a hair dryer, a hole in these copper wires carries LCW to remove heat generated by the electric currents.

The PEP ring, the SSRL ring and various beam transport lines contain many magnets that use LCW. Unlike hair dryers, the concern with mixing water and electricity in the magnets is not electrocution, but corrosion. Lowering the water's conductivity effectively minimizes this corrosiveness.

Without LCW, the magnets would slowly be eaten away from the inside out and engineers would have to find another way to dissipate as much as 30 megawatts—16,000 hair dryers worth—of power every day.

We’ll treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care. If you suffer a fire damage event, please refer to our Fire Damage Tips—Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Fire Safety Checklist for Small Business Owners

6/1/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Safety Checklist for Small Business Owners Fire Safety Checklist for Small Business Owners

Every commercial building should take fire prevention seriously, but small businesses tend to have more at stake than other companies. Small business owners rely on their business’s ability to function, and a fire in their building can lead to devastating circumstances. While not every fire can be prevented, there’s a long checklist of ways to ensure your business is as safe as possible from fire risks.

Fire Protection Systems

Fire protection systems are crucial in every business, especially fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and a commercial fire sprinkler system. Requirements vary for different areas and buildings, but the typical requirement is that every 3,000 square feet of area need a fire extinguisher. There are also different types of fire extinguishers used for various purposes, so every business owner should know which fire extinguisher is right for their specific business.

For restaurant owners, an automatic fire suppression system is also crucial, as over half of all restaurant fires involve cooking equipment. The system automatically dispenses chemicals to suppress a cooking fire and will shut down the fuel or electric supply to other cooking equipment in the kitchen when activated.

We’ll treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care. If you suffer a fire damage event, please refer to our Fire Damage Tips—Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Have Questions? Call Us Today – 203-630-2273

Fire Damage Clean Up Service in New Jersey

5/14/2018 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Damage Clean Up Service in New Jersey Fire Damage Clean Up Service in New Jersey

Soot is oily and easily stains most household textiles.

Don’t try to clean up soot using your vacuum because the brushes and most attachments tend to force soot deeper into fabrics. A fire restoration company will also have access to chemical cleaning additives called “counteractants” that break down smoke at the molecular level to eliminate odours. There are various types of counteractants available, and which should be used varies with the type of materials that burned in the fire. Dry cleaners may also be able to provide them to you for washing clothing.

To clean soot from walls and other flat surfaces, use a chemical sponge available from a cleaning supply company or at minimum a non-water-based cleaner. Rubbing alcohol or diluted paint thinner may also work for particularly nasty soot, but only use with caution because of the danger of toxic fumes. Remember to wear rubber gloves and use proper ventilation while working.

We’ll treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care. If you suffer a fire damage event, please refer to our Fire Damage Tips—Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Fire Protection during the Winter

11/28/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Protection during the Winter Fire Protection during the Winter

Although winter comes as no surprise, many of us are not ready for its arrival. If you are prepared for the hazards of winter, you will be more likely to stay safe and healthy when temperatures start to fall.

As we know, many people prefer to remain indoors in the winter, but staying inside is no guarantee of safety. Take these steps to keep your home safe and warm during the winter months.

Winter is a time when household fires occur. It is a good time to remember to:

  • Buy and install smoke alarms on every floor of your home
  • Test smoke alarms monthly
  • Practice fire drills with your children
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector outside bedrooms
  • Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that could burn, and turn them off when leaving the room or sleeping.

Electric Power Damage from Power cords

11/3/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Electric Power Damage from Power cords Eliminate Electric Power Damage from Power cords

Power cords on electrical appliances that are moved frequently receive a lot of abuse. These include vacuum cleaners, floor polishers, power tools and other portable appliances. Often, the damage occurs at the plug (i.e., a missing ground prong on a three pronged grounded plug).

Damaged and ungrounded power cords pose serious hazards to users of the appliance including electrical shock and risk of fire. Missing ground prongs on power cord plugs usually result from users pulling on the cord to remove the plug from the outlet instead of handling the plug directly.

In some cases, the plug may be pulled from the wire covering, exposing the inner wires to damage. Power cords can become frayed or damaged from heavy use, age, or excessive current flow through the wiring.

When a power cord is damaged, the appliance should be removed from service and the cord replaced as soon as possible to reduce the risk of electrical shock, electrocution or fire. Cord damage can also result when the cord is pinched, caught between or punctured by heavy objects such as legs on a desk. This damage could lead to a short circuit and result in a fire. Also, cords placed under stress, such as when a heavy appliance is hung by its cord, could eventually cause damage to the cord or plug.

For greater detail on power cords, please see www.compliance.gov.

Summer Fire Safety

6/13/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Summer Fire Safety Summer Fire Safety

Summer fire safety - Campfire Safety Tips

Every year everybody look forward to summer vacations, camping, family reunions, picnics, and the Fourth of July. Summertime, however, also brings fires and injuries due to fireworks and outdoor cooking. Encourage summer fire safety in your community with these tips.

Campfire Safety Tips

If you'll be spending the summer camping or just toasting marshmallows in the back yard, it's a good idea to educate yourself about campfire safety.

Follow Area Rules

Always follow the campfire rules for the area where you are camping or living. Some parks and towns prohibit fires, and these rules are there for a reason. Check the local regulations before you build your fire.

Know to Stop, Drop, and Roll

It is important to make sure that all members of your family know to "Stop, Drop, and Roll" if an article of clothing ever catches on fire. Instead of just talking about it to young children, practice the steps together.

Check Your Surroundings

Choose a location for your campfire where it will not spread. Never build a campfire near any dry leaves or grassy areas or under overhanging tree branches. Before building a campfire, clear away all shrubbery and vegetation from the area, dig a pit for the fire, and surround it with rocks.

Be Smart About Lighter Fluid

Do not store gasoline, liquid fire starter, or any other type of flammable liquid near the campfire. It's too easy for stray flames to ignite these materials.

Keep Your Fire Away from the Tent

Do not place your campfire near the tent. It should always be placed downwind from the tent. Only use tents made from flame-retardant materials if you'll be having a campfire.

Keep It Under Control

Do not build large campfires, even if they seem impressive. It's much safer to keep fires small so they are easier to control.

Stay Nearby

Never leave a campfire lit if there is no one to attend to it. If you're going to sleep for the night, always take the time to put the fire out.

Be Prepared

Never light a campfire if you do not have the means of extinguishing it. Always keep plenty of water and a shovel near the campfire to use in an emergency and to put the campfire out when you are finished using it.

Know How to Put It Out

To extinguish a campfire douse it with water, use the shovel to bury the fire with ash and dirt. Then douse the area with water.

Source : www.ovetoknow.com

Why SERVPRO of Morristown to complete your Fire Damage Restoration

6/7/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Why SERVPRO of Morristown to complete your Fire Damage Restoration Why SERVPRO of Morristown to complete your Fire Damage Restoration?

Smoke and fire damage is dependent on several factors which all impact on the fire damage restoration process.

The temperature of the fire and smoke movement determines what damage occurs, and predominately where the most damage occurs. Smoke can penetrate the smallest areas; so it is common in fire and smoke damaged houses are areas that weren’t affected first hand by the fire. It is critical to ensure the fire damage restoration begins as soon as possible.

As smoke is acidic, moisture and humidity are a catalyst to the corrosive dilapidation of finishes and fixtures in the premises. It is hard to imagine a situation more traumatising and unwanted than a fire in your home. Even a small fire can cause extensive damage and impact on your family’s sense of security.

Our Fire Damage Restoration emergency response team are knowledgeable and sympathetic to your situation and should be the first step towards putting your life back together. Securing your home to prevent further damage or deterioration is our number one priority.

SERVPRO of Morristown, NJ’s tried and tested fire restoration methods mean we are able to save many building components and valuable personal items. Even if the damage looks severe, items can often be remediated to the pre-damage condition. From furniture to appliances, computers and even family heirlooms, our team of Fire Damage Restoration specialists have developed methods to successfully remediate your personal belongings, saving you from more heartache in this unfortunate event.

Fast facts about fire !!

6/5/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fast facts about fire !! Fast facts about fire !!
Home fires
  • Half of home fire deaths result from fires reported between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Only one in five home fires were reported during these hours.
  • One-quarter of home fire deaths were caused by fires that started in the bedroom. Another quarter resulted from fires in the living room, family room or den.
  • Three out of five home fire deaths happen from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • On average, seven people die in U.S. home fires per day.
  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home fire injuries, followed by heating equipment.
  • Smoking materials are the leading cause of home fire deaths.
Escape planning
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, less than half  ever practiced it.
  • One-third of survey respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!
Smoke alarms
  • Three out of five home fire deaths in 2010-2014 were caused by fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 94% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated 80% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.

Fire damage can be devastating for you and your family. Feelings of confusion and stress are common, and you need a caring expert to guide you through this crisis. We always treat your family with the greatest empathy and respect, and we’ll treat your property with great care.

Please refer to our Fire Damage Tips - Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (201) 255-7731

Source : http://www.nfpa.org

Electricity makes our lives easier !!

5/22/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Electricity makes our lives easier !! Electricity makes our lives easier !!

Flipping a light switch. Plugging in a coffeemaker. Charging a laptop computer. These are second nature for most of us. Electricity makes our lives easier. However, we need to be cautious and keep safety in mind.


 


SAFETY TIPS



  • Have all electrical work done by a qualified electrician.

  • When you are buying or remodeling a home, have it inspected by a qualified private inspector or in accordance with local requirements.

  • Only use one heat-producing appliance (such as a coffee maker, toaster, space heater, etc.) plugged into a receptacle outlet at a time.

  • Major appliances (refrigerators, dryers, washers, stoves, air conditioners, microwave ovens, etc.) should be plugged directly into a wall receptacle outlet. Extension cords and plug strips should not be used.

  • Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) shut off electricity when a dangerous condition occurs. Consider having them installed in your home.

  • Use ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) to reduce the risk of shock. GFCIs shut off an electrical circuit when it becomes a shock hazard. They should be installed inside the home in bathrooms, kitchens, garages and basements. All outdoor receptacles should be GFCI protected.

  • Test AFCIs and GFCIs once a month according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. You do not need a flame to start a fire. Fires can start when heat builds up near things that burn. This can happen when a hot light bulb is near things that burn, such as cloth or paper, or a cord has been placed under a carpet.

  • Check electrical cords to make sure they are not running across doorways or under carpets. Extension cords are intended for temporary use. Have a qualified electrician add more receptacle outlets so you don’t have to use extension cords.

  • Use a light bulb with the right number of watts. There should be a sticker that indicates the right number of watts.


Source : http://www.nfpa.org/


 

Electricity Safety Checklist

5/22/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Electricity Safety Checklist Electricity Safety Checklist

  • Call a qualified electrician or your landlord if you have:

    • Frequent problems with blowing fuses or tripping circuit breakers

    • A tingling feeling when you touch an electrical appliance

    • Discolored or warm wall outlets

    • A burning or rubbery smell coming from an appliance

    • Flickering or dimming lights

    • Sparks from an outlet q Inspect your home for hidden electrical hazards. 





  • Inspect your home for hidden electrical hazards.

  • Check electrical cords to make sure the wires are not damaged, cracked or loose. If the cords need to be repaired, take the item to a professional repair shop, hire an electrician or replace with a new item.

  • Make sure cords are not running across doorways or under carpets. If they are, have a qualified electrician install more outlets.

  • Keep children away from electric cords and outlets. Cords placed in the mouth can cause a burn and objects placed in a receptacle can cause a shock, burns or electrocution.

  • Make sure that all receptacle outlets and switches have faceplates.

  • Never put more than one plug in each receptacle. An outlet may have one or more receptacles — one to receive each plug.

  • Be sure that the bulbs in your lights match what is safe for the lamp. There should be a sticker that indicates the maximum wattage for the light bulb — such as use maximum of a 60 watt bulb.

  • Light bulbs in the living area of your home, including closets, should have a shade or globe for protection. Light bulbs can get very hot and cause a fire if something that can burn is too close.

  • Ground-fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) reduce the risk of shock by shutting off an electrical circuit when the circuit could be a shock hazard. Your home should have GFCIs in the kitchen, bathroom(s), laundry, basement, garage, and outdoor areas.

  • Heat producing appliances such as a toaster, coffee maker, iron or microwave oven draw a lot of electricity. Plug only one heat producing appliance in each outlet to prevent wiring from overheating.

  • Buy only appliances that are listed by a qualified testing laboratory.

  • Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) protect against fire by monitoring the electrical current in a circuit and shutting off the circuit when unintended arcing occurs. AFCIs should be installed in your home. If not, have a qualified electrician install them for you.

  • Keep ladders away from overhead power lines, including the electrical service into your home.


Source : http://www.nfpa.org

Smart Habits That Can Prevent Fire

5/17/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Smart Habits That Can Prevent Fire Smart Habits That Can Prevent Fire - SERVPRO of Morristown

The 7 Ways to Prepare for a Home Fire

  1. Install the right number of smoke alarms. Test them once a month and replace the batteries at least once a year.

  2. Teach children what smoke alarms sound like and what to do when they hear one.

  3. Ensure that all household members know two ways to escape from every room of your home and know the family meeting spot outside of your home.

  4. Establish a family emergency communications plan and ensure that all household members know who to contact if they cannot find one another.

  5. Practice escaping from your home at least twice a year. Press the smoke alarm test button or yell “Fire“ to alert everyone that they must get out.

  6. Make sure everyone knows how to call 9-1-1.

  7. Teach household members to STOP, DROP and ROLL if their clothes should catch on fire.

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (800) 734-3213

Source : http://www.redcross.org